NOVEMber EXHIBITIONS

OPening: 7th of November 5:30pm, artist talks at 6pm

8th - 24th november 2018

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Front Gallery + FELTdark: Callum Harper (UK/VIC) - motorola razr my heart out

Callum Harper (Australia, 1993) works with notions around LGBT culture, and combines discourse around reality and online life to create dialogue around the disparate differences of communication IRL vs URL. Primarily working with text, video and performance, Harper travels to varied destinations of contrasting political values toward LGBT citizens, and internalises locals opinions and his personal experiences on acceptance and daily life. The amalgamation of this collected experiential information and research data informs the medium and personal responses to experiences within differing contexts. Harper also speaks of queer love, and the notion of finding the one in the technological era. In 2018, where suitors for love, intimacy and sex can be found on a device we always place in our pockets, there are questions whether accessibility has voided ability to maintain conversation in the sea of superficial profile pictures and if the one is really within a 10km radius of your bedroom. Harper holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Monash University in Caulfield, Australia, and a Master of Fine Arts from Konstfack in Stockholm, Sweden.

 Installation view of Deep Dark, Desperate / Eat Your Saints, Deborah Prior & Jess Taylor

Installation view of Deep Dark, Desperate / Eat Your Saints, Deborah Prior & Jess Taylor


Back Gallery: Deborah Prior & Jess Taylor (SA) - Deep, Dark, Desperate / Eat Your Saints

Deep, Dark, Desperate / Eat Your Saints is a multi-sensory installation and performance exploring individual and collective acts of violence through a feminist lens. Engaging with the morally ambiguous, voyeuristic pleasures of horror films, acts of brutality from canons of art and anatomy, and the martyrdom of saints, the exhibition will use cast forms from the artists’ own bodies, offering them up as sacrificial vessels.

Realised in wax and chocolate, these vessels are intended to be destroyed and consumed – by both the artists and audience – slipping between liquid/solid in a transformative process evoking magic, miracles, and entropy. As a historically bodily material, wax recorded the physical presence of the dead or diseased. Chocolate is equally fleshy, but an object of desire, and a reminder of the Dangerous Appetites of Women.

Through abject, simulated acts of immolation and cannibalism, the artists will confront the extreme cultural unease surrounding female bodies and identities.